LACIS Courses

Please see below for information about LACIS’ Summer and Fall 2020 Course Offerings:

Courses from across the University count towards the LACIS major. It is important to keep in mind that some courses in other schools and colleges (outside Letters and Science) may not count for degree credit. Be sure to check with your advisor to ensure that courses taken outside Letters and Science will count towards the major.

Other non-LACIS courses will count towards the LACIS major if they contain at least 25% of content related to the LACIS area. If you are interested in a course that does not automatically count for LACIS credit, but which has significant LACIS content, you may petition for its inclusion by filling out the Course Content Petition form and the Course Content Verification form. Because the content of a course is dependent on who teaches it in a given semester, it is important to always check with your advisor to be sure that the courses you plan to take are still eligible for LACIS credit. Because course content changes frequently, LACIS reserves the right to deny credit for any course at any time if the content of that course does not meet the 25% standard (even if the course appears or has appeared on one of the course lists in the past).

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SUMMER 2020 Courses:

LACIS 260: LATIN AMERICA: AN INTRODUCTION (3 Credits)

MEETS ONLINE: June 1st to June 28th

INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Hernandez

DESCRIPTION: Latin American culture and society from an interdisciplinary perspective; historical developments from pre-Columbian times to the present; political movements; economic problems; social change; ecology in tropical Latin America; legal systems; literature and the arts; cultural contrasts involving the US and Latin America; land reform; labor movements; capitalism, socialism, imperialism; mass media.

NOTES: Fulfills LACIS’ Introductory Course Requirement.

LACIS Fall 2020 Courses:

LACIS 268: THE U.S. & LATIN AMERICA FROM THE COLONIAL ERA TO THE PRESENT (3 Credits)

MEETS: T/R, 9:30-10:45

INSTRUCTOR: Patrick Barrett

DESCRIPTION: A critical examination of US-Latin American relations from the colonial era to the present, tracing the emergence and evolution of the United States as a hemispheric and global power and its political and economic impact on Latin America. Primary attention will be focused on US relations with Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, but other Latin American countries will figure prominently during certain episodes.

LACIS 440 (Section #1): CURRENT ISSUES IN THE LACIS REGION (1 Credit)

MEETS: T, 12:30-1:30 (A free lunch is served from 12:00-12:30 on a first-come, first-served basis)

INSTRUCTOR: Alberto Vargas

DESCRIPTION: The Latin American Caribbean and Iberian Colloquium brings together undergraduate and graduate students with experienced scholars in the field.  Its goal is to contribute actively to the professional development of Latin American scholars by giving them an opportunity to present and discuss their research in a constructive atmosphere. The Colloquium will thus provide the opportunity to meet experts as well as fellow students and community members from different backgrounds working on related topics.

LACIS 440 (Section #2): RACE IN THE AMERICAS (3 Credits)

MEETS: M/W, 4:00-5:15

INSTRUCTOR: Victor Goldgel-Carballo

DESCRIPTION: Why is it that the same person can be white in Cuba or in Brazil but black in the U.S.? How does racism work in countries where “there are no races”? How does Latin America help us understand what race means in the U.S.? With a focus on the present, this course is an introduction to the contradictory notions of race that have developed across the Americas, and in Cuba, Brazil, and the U.S in particular. We will focus on how race was transformed after the revolutions of independence, and on key concepts such as mestizaje, racial democracy, and color-blindness. Through an analysis of key texts produced in Latin America, the Caribbean, and the US, we will explore how race intersects with gender, class, and migration in light of major historical processes, including slavery, anti-colonial struggles, and US expansionism. The course will be conducted in English and readings will be drawn from a variety of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

LACIS 982: INTERDEPARTMENTAL GRAD/UNDERGRAD SEMINAR ON LATIN AMERICA (3 Credits)

MEETS: T, 2:30-4:30

INSTRUCTOR: Kata Beilin

DESCRIPTION: This seminar introduces a series of topics and issues that are central to an interdisciplinary understanding of the Latin American region. We consider a range of topics including the region’s history, indigenous cultures, economic and environmental challenges, media systems, legal and human rights debates, educational policies, gender issues, science and technology, agriculture, and new social movements. This seminar is designed to serve the needs of graduate students specializing in various fields of social sciences, humanities and also science students interested in acquiring more knowledge about the region.

NOTES: Advanced undergraduate students may enroll with instructor’s consent.

Fall 2020 ANTHRO/LACIS Courses:

ANTHRO/LACIS 361: ELEMENTARY QUECHUA (4 Credits)

MEETS: M/T/W/R, 8:50-9:40

INSTRUCTOR: Armando Muyolema

DESCRIPTION: Phonology and morphology; concentration on the acquisition of conversational skills; reading of texts of graded difficulty; three hours classroom and one hour lab.

ANTHRO/LACIS 363: INTERMEDIATE QUECHUA (4 Credits)

MEETS: M/T/W/R, 9:55-10:45

INSTRUCTOR: Armando Muyolema

DESCRIPTION: Phonology and morphology; concentration on the acquisition of conversational skills; reading of texts of graded difficulty; three hours classroom and one hour lab.

ANTHRO/LACIS 376: FIRST SEMESTER YUCATEC MAYA (4 Credits)

MEETS: M/T/W/R, 8:50-9:40

INSTRUCTOR: Jessica Hurley

DESCRIPTION: Introduction to Yucatec Maya language. Focus on acquiring vocabulary and grammar for basic conversational proficiency. Taught through in-class oral and aural exercises, language tapes, and primary texts. Students also learn about Maya culture, history, folklore, and language politics.

Fall 2020 HISTORY Course:

HIST 500: HISTORICAL POLITICAL ECOLOGY (3 Credits)

MEETS: R, 3:30-5:25

INSTRUCTOR: Tinker Visiting Professor, German Palacio (Universidad Nacional de Colombia-Sede Amazonia)

DESCRIPTION: This course introduces students to the broad discussion of Latin American political ecology in an environmental history perspective. In this case, it is not a regional history of Latin America, but a multiscale vision that combines global, hemispherical, and Latin American scales. In the second part of the course, the global scale is studied in friction with the Amazon region. This exercise will let students to understand contemporary Amazon history, in a period when the Amazon become not only a globalized region, but also a region strongly defined in environmental or ecological terms.

Are you a faculty member looking to submit your course to the LACIS approved course list? If so, please complete the submission form Here. Please note: In order for a course to meet our criteria, 25% of its content must focus on Latin America, the Caribbean and/or Iberian Peninsula. This 25% minimum is aggregate over the entire semester and can be a combination of different countries/regions/topics, etc